Research on Light Therapy for Hemophilic Synovitis

Articles and Abstracts on Hemophilic Synovitis

Low intensity laser therapy speeds wound healing in hemophilia by enhancing platelet procoagulant activity

Hoffman M, Monroe DM.

Source
Department of Pathology, Duke University and Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, Durham, North Carolina 27705, USA. maureane.hoffman@va.gov

Abstract
Our group has previously shown that cutaneous wound healing is delayed and histologically abnormal in a mouse model of hemophilia. Hemostasis is not only required to stop bleeding at the time of wounding, but also produces bioactive substances that promote appropriate inflammatory and proliferative responses during healing. Low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has been reported to enhance impaired wound healing in a variety of animal and human studies. The current studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that LILT can improve healing in a hemophilia B mouse model. Three daily treatments with 12 J/sq cm of 650 nm laser illumination reduced the time to closure of a 3-mm cutaneous punch biopsy wound in the hemophilic mice. All wounds were closed at 13 days in the sham-treated hemophilic mice, compared with 10 days in the LILT-treated hemophilic mice, and 9 days in wild-type mice. While LILT can speed healing by enhancing proliferation of cutaneous cells, we found that an additional mechanism likely contributes to the efficacy of LILT in the hemophilic mice. LILT enhanced the mechanical rigidity and platelet activity of clots formed from human platelet-rich plasma. Illumination of isolated platelets increased the mitochondrial membrane potential and enhanced binding of coagulation factors to the surface of activated platelets. Thus, while LILT can directly promote proliferative responses during healing, it also appears to enhance hemostasis in an animal model with impaired coagulation. These data suggest that trials of LILT as an adjunct to the usual hemostatic therapies in hemophilia are warranted.
© 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.
PMID:
22882528
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

 

 

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